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Archaeology & Anthropology Field Schools

Central America - Belize - Maya Research Program's 25th archaeological field season - 2016

Central America - Belize - Maya Research Program's 25th archaeological field season - 2016

Archaeology Field School Location and Dates

Application Deadline
2016-07-17
Start Date 2016-05-30
End Date 2016-07-30

Multiple Sessions Yes
Multiple Session information 2016 Season Dates:
Session 1: Monday May 30th - Sunday June 12th
Session 2: Monday June 13th - Sunday June 26th
(*WEEK BREAK* Travel opportunities available)
Session 3: Monday July 4th - Sunday July 17th
Session 4: Monday July 18th - Sunday July 31st

Archaeology Field School Location
Blue Creek Village, Orangewalk District, Belize

Archaeology Field School Tuition and Credits

Sponsoring College/Institution
University of Texas at Tyler
Academic Credit
3 hours per two week session
Archaeology Field School Tuition
Cost: The donation for a single two-week session for non-students is $ $1750 USD. A special first-session rate of $1500 is available to students currently enrolled in an accredited University or College. If more than one session is desired, the donation is $1200 for each additional session. (For instance, a student would pay $1500 USD for their first 2 week session and $1200 USD for their second 2 week session for a total of $2700 for 4 weeks. Students are encouraged to apply for a MRP scholarship to reduce their cost to $1700 for 4 weeks. ) A non-refundable deposit of $250 per session is required to hold your spot. (Participants are responsible for their travel costs to Belize). If a student wishes to receive academic credit, tuition costs (via the University of Texas at Tyler or their home institution) will apply in addition to the required donation to the Maya Research Program.
Archaeology Field School Room and Board
Included
Archaeology Field School Travel
Travel to Belize not included
Additional Information on Tution/Room and Board/Travel Costs
Cost: The donation for a single two-week session for non-students is $ $1750 USD. A special first-session rate of $1500 is available to students currently enrolled in an accredited University or College. If more than one session is desired, the donation is $1200 for each additional session. (For instance, a student would pay $1500 USD for their first 2 week session and $1200 USD for their second 2 week session for a total of $2700 for 4 weeks. Students are encouraged to apply for a MRP scholarship to reduce their cost to $1700 for 4 weeks. ) A non-refundable deposit of $250 per session is required to hold your spot. (Participants are responsible for their travel costs to Belize). If a student wishes to receive academic credit, tuition costs (via the University of Texas at Tyler or their home institution) will apply in addition to the required donation to the Maya Research Program.

Archaeology Field School Description


The Maya Research Program (MRP) is a non-profit organization (501 C3) that sponsors archaeological and ethnographic research in Middle America. Each summer since 1992, MRP has supported archaeological research in northwestern Belize. The Blue Creek Archaeological Project includes research at the sites of Blue Creek, Xnoha, Nojol Nah, Tulix Mul, Tamarindo, and Grey Fox. MRP has been instrumental in documenting and protecting numerous Maya sites in northwestern Belize. Over 3000 students and volunteers have participated in the project in the past 24 years. The current Blue Creek project team includes faculty members and graduate students from over a dozen universities worldwide. In addition, the Blue Creek field school has been certified by the Register of Professional Archaeologists and is affiliated with the University of Texas at Tyler.

This summer marks MRP’s Blue Creek Archaeological Project’s 25th archaeological field season in northwestern Belize. MRP is proud to support a vast range of talented researchers from across the globe under this project’s umbrella. Our research associates include not only archaeologists, but also soil scientists, geoarchaeologists, geographers, conservationists, cultural anthropologists, bioarchaeologists, and botanists.

From May to July of each year, MRP hosts four two-week sessions for students and volunteers at Blue Creek. Everyone is a full participant in the effort and is involved with field excavations and laboratory work. Y

Application Process: The maximum number of participants for each 2-week archaeological field school session ranges from 20 to 25 students and volunteers. Participants will be accepted on a first come, first served basis. To enroll, the applicant should forward a 2016 enrollment form (http://www.mayaresearchprogram.org ) and appropriate deposit to the Maya Research Program.

The Maya Research Program also offers specialized laboratory and field courses for students and volunteers in addition to the general archaeological field school. The specific study areas for the specialized laboratory and field courses are:
1. Laboratory and Field Methods: Artifact Analysis and PXRF - limited to 5 persons in Session 3
2. Laboratory and Field Methods: Bioarchaeology (the study of human skeletal remains) -limited to 5 persons in Session 3.
3. Laboratory and Field Methods: Photogrammetry and 3D Digital Modeling - limited to 10 persons in Session 4 only. Student scholarships and fellowships are available.

Archaeology Field School Additional Information

Archaeology Field School Type
archaeology, prehistory, bioarchaeology, osteology, GIS, archaeometry, goearchaeology, 3D modeling
Time Period
Maya Classic Period
Field School Setting/Conditions
The archaeological sites are in the forests of Belize.
How is the project area accessed each day
Via truck and van
What is the daily schedule for the field school
Our work schedule is rigorous but will not overwhelm you. We will leave for the field shortly after 7AM and return early enough to allow you to relax a bit and take care of personal chores (usually by 4 pm). Various assignments are made to enable us to achieve the project goals. You will be one of about 10 volunteers per team.
Number of years this Archaeology Field School has been in operation
24 years
Is there a professional certification for this field school
Yes - the field school has been certified by the Register of Professional Archaeologists (RPA)
Directors and Instructors
2016 Blue Creek Archaeological Project Staff •Dr. Tim Beach, University of Texas at Austin •Pieta Greaves, AOC Archaeology, Scotland •Dr. Thomas Guderjan, University of Texas at Tyler •Colleen Hanratty, Southern Methodist University •Dr. Sheryl Luzzadder-Beach, University of Texas at Austin •Greg Mastropietro, SWCA Environmental Consultants •Kent Mead, SWCA Environmental Consultants •Steven J. Morgan Moodie, Trent University •Dr. Holly Moyes, University of California, Merced •Dr. Alexander Parmington, LaTrobe University and Wurundjeri Tribe and Land Council, Australia •Hannah Plumer, University of Sheffield •Carlos Quiroz, St. John’s College, Belize •Greg Savoie, University of Leicester •Justin Telepak, Austin, Texas •Bob Warden, Texas A&M University •Marc Wolf, City Univ of New York and Indiana University-East. Blue Creek Support Staff •Margaretha Dyck - Camp Cook Ben Dyck - Camp Maintenance MRP Board of Directors •Dr. Grace Bascopé (Dallas, TX) •Bill Collins (emeritus, Long Beach, CA) •Kim A. Cox (Corpus Christi, TX) •Jennifer Fawcett (Berkeley, CA) •Dr. Thomas Guderjan (Tyler, TX) •Colleen Hanratty (Tyler, TX) •Bob Hibschman (Eugene, OR) •Dale Pastrana (emeritus, El Paso, TX) •Dr. Keith Peacock (emeritus, Laurel, MD) •Justin Telepak (Austin, Texas)
Specialized skills you will have the opportunity to learn
Students will learn archaeological excavation techniques, field recording techniques, laboratory procedures, and artifact analysis and curation techniques. The Maya Research Program also offers specialized laboratory and field courses for students and volunteers in addition to the general archaeological field school. The specific study areas for the specialized laboratory and field courses are: 1. Laboratory and Field Methods: Artifact Analysis (ceramic, lithic, groundstone, and obsidian anaysis; XRF) - limited to 5 persons in Session 3 2. Laboratory and Field Methods: Bioarchaeology (the study of human skeletal remains) -limited to 5 persons in Session 3. 3. Laboratory and Field Methods: Photogrammetry and 3D Digital Modeling - limited to 10 persons in Session 4 only.
On rain days will there be lab work?
Yes
Will there be additional organized activities?
Yes. We visit the local cenote (lake) after work each day (as well as local stores). There are also trips to the national park of Lamanai and the resort lodge on Sunday (our day off).
Will there be additional organized activities?
Yes. Evening lectures are also offered on various specialized topics. Here are some of our Twilight Lectures: •Geoarchaeology of Ancient Maya Agriculture, Dr. Tim Beach, Univ of Texas at Austin. •Geochemistry and archaeological studies in Mesoamerican and Thailand, Dr. Duncan Cook, Australia Catholic University. •2000 years of climate change in Mesoamerica. Melisa Bishop, Univ of Nevada, LV. •Geochemical Signatures of Contemporary and Ancient Maya Activities in Plazas. Dr. Richard Terry, Brigham Young University •Modelling the Agricultural Potential of Landforms at Tikal National Park, Guatemala. Dr. Chris Balzotti, Brigham Young University. •Three decades of understanding the Maya of NW Belize and Building Models of Ancient Maya Trade from Blue Creek and Ambergris Caye, Belize, Dr. Thomas Guderjan, University of Texas at Tyler. •Using Geoarchaeology to Observe the Ancient Human-Environment Complex. Dr. Sheryl-Luzzadder-Beach and Timothy Beach, University of Texas at Austin. •Studying the past of NW Belize and Maya Ceramics analysis Colleen Hanratty, Southern Methodist University. •A Matter of Time: Understanding Maya Calendrics, Colleen Hanratty, Southern Methodist University. •Bioarchaeology 101, Hannah Plumer, University of Sheffield (England). •CRM Archaeology in the US, Greg Mastroprieto and Kent Mead, SWCA •Tribal Approaches to CRM in Australia, Dr. Alex Parmington, LaTrobe Univ. •Mapping the Maya World, Marc Wolf, Indiana University-East and CUNY. •Looting the Maya Past, Dr. Donna Yates, University of Glasgow (Scotland) •The Philosophy of Science and 3D imaging, Bob Warden, Texas A&M University. •Conserving the Stratfordshire Hoard, Pieta Graeves, AOC Archaeology (Scotland) High Resolution Imagery and Remote Sensing Algorithms to Identify the Extent of Ancient Maya Wetland Canals. Katarina Doctor, George Mason University •When the Sky Fell Down: The Chicxulub Impact. Dr. Eric Gaidos, Univ of Hawaii. •GIS applications in Archaeology, Samantha Krause, University of Texas at Austin. •Ancient Maya Impacts on the Modern Forest, Dr. Nick Brokaw, University of Puerto Rico. •What Not to Believe about the Maya, Dr. Elizabeth Graham, Univ College-London.
Is travel restriced during free time?
No

Other resources students will find useful
You can find MRP's participant guide, field reports, academic and popular press articles, virtual museum, and photo albums on our website: http://www.mayaresearchprogram.org

Archaeology Field School Contact Information and Website

Field School Website: http://www.mayaresearchprogram.org

Field School Contact Information



Dr. Thomas H. Guderjan 1910 East Southeast Loop 323 #296 Tyler, Texas 75701

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Field School Contact Website: http://www.mayaresearchprogram.org


  
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